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Avi Kiriaty David Kiyabu Don Blanding
Original limited edition serigraphs by Hawaii artist, Avi Kiriaty available for purchase.
Lynn Andrews Schubert, Cynthia Toshiko Takaezu
Original, hand-painted mixed media prints by Lynn Andrews.
Toshiko Takaezu was one of the first artists to explore ceramic’s possibilities as an independent aesthetic medium. She revolutionized the field with abstract shapes, painterly glazes, and lyrical installations. Inspired by ceramist Maija Grotell, her teacher at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, Takaezu absorbed a philosophy of irregularity and asymmetry and drew upon diverse artistic influences from Europe, Asia, and the natural world. Takaezu was also strongly influenced by the theories of Hong Kong–born potter Bernard Leach and the works of Hamada Shoji, which taught her the Zen approach of intuition and formal simplification that shaped the artist’s mature style.

Through her mastery of ancient firing techniques, Takaezu created earthenware that reached sculptural heights, just as her exploration of surface decoration led her to use glaze with the same expressiveness as abstract painters. Takaezu’s ceramics lucidly articulate the cross-cultural influences of East and West, bridging her American, Hawaiian, and Japanese heritages while announcing her originality and independence.

Born in Hawaii in 1922 to Japanese immigrant parents, Takaezu initially worked at a commercial clay studio and pursued her interest in ceramics at the University of Hawaii under the tutelage of Claude Horan. In 1951 she continued her studies at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts in Bloomfield Hills, MI. At the Academy she met and befriended Finnish ceramist Maija Grotell, a strong believer in experimentation and in allowing students to find their own way, and who became her mentor. In 1955 Takaezu traveled to Japan where she studied Zen Buddhism and the techniques of traditional Japanese pottery. Upon her return to the United States, Takaezu accepted a teaching position as head of the Ceramics Department at the National Cleveland Institute of Art in Ohio. She taught at the Cleveland Institute of Art for nearly a decade and for 25 years at Princeton, where she helped to develop the visual art program. She retired from Princeton in 1992. She received the Tiffany Foundation Grant in 1964, which afforded her the opportunity to establish a studio in Quakertown, NJ.

In her stoneware and porcelain works, some small enough to fit in the palm of one hand, others monoliths more than six feet tall, Ms. Takaezu blended the expressive bravura of painters like Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline with the calm, meditative quality of traditional Japanese pottery in forms suggestive of acorns, melons or tree trunks.

Early in her career she made traditional vessels, but in the late 1950s, strongly influenced by the Finnish ceramist Maija Grotell, she embraced the notion of ceramic pieces as artworks meant to be seen rather than used. She closed off the top of her vessels creating, in effect, a clay canvas for glazing of all kinds: brushing, dripping, pouring and dipping.

The many awards and honors she received, from the Hawaii Living Treasure Award to her honorary doctorate degree from the University of Princeton, demonstrate the wide range of people and institutions that find inspiration, history, and meaning in her work and life.
Nobuya Abe Satoru Abe Adachi Soho
Adachihara Gen Philip Adams Adelmoral
Alfred T. Agate Bumpei Akaji Akihide 明秀
Akina Akiyama, Iwao Akizuki Tanetatsu
Martha Alexander Joan Allen Mabel Alvarez
Eguchi Amado Kazumi Amano Amano, Kunihiro 天野 邦弘
Ameya Yumin Pamela Andelin Richard Anderson
Andrew Annenberg Aoyama, Masaharu 青山 正治 Jacques Arago
Asada, Benji 麻田 辯次 Asada, Hiroshi Toshio Asaeda
Asano Shun'o Asano, Takeji 浅野 竹二 Ashiyuki 芦幸
Mildred Shoob Ayling Azechi, Umetaro 畦地 梅太 郎 Back Pa
Bai Xue Shi 白雪石 Edward Bailey Joan Baker
Cyrus Leroy Baldridge Matsubara, Banryu Louise Barr
Charles W. Bartlett Reem Bassous The Batik Village
Emile Bayard Shirley Bean Alexander Befelein
Taguchi Beisaku 田口 米作 Jill Bell Carol Bennett
Elton Bennett Ferry Bertholet E.D. Betts
George Bigot Biho 美 邦 Paul Binnie
Michael Birch Bishu 美州 Marguerite Blasingame
Nicholas Bleecker W. Blohm Bo Da
Regina Bode Seki Bokuo Jean Boone
Boretuch Bill Braden Joel Bright
E. Bainbridge Broughton Alan Brown Eliphalet Brown
Kevin Brown Mark Brown Sean K. L. Browne
Adrien Hubert Brue W.A. Bryant Guy Buffet
Lee Sang Bum Ippitsusai Buncho Nishibe Bunjo
Hirayama Bunkyo Kasumi Bunsho Robyn Buntin
Burdge A. Ray Burrell Dorothy Buscemi
Jeremy Bush Bussukan Lyman Byxbe
Cai Tian-Xiong 蔡天雄 Marcel Cailliet Cao Kejia 曹克家
Xu Cao 徐操 David Carlin A. Carmona
Giovanni Maria Cassini Mark Catesby George Catlin
Chang De Chang Yu Jean Charlot
Martin Charlot Chen Gao Jun Ch'en Heng Ching
Chen Jia Kai 陈嘉楷 Ande Lau Chen Jie Chen 陳捷
Chen, Xu 陳喣 Chen Yuan Zhang Yvonne Cheng
Lee Chesney Joey Chiarello Chiei
Chigai Zenri Toyohara Chikanobu 豊原 周延 Morikawa, Chikashige 守川 周重
Okabe Chikufuu Morikawa Chikuso Chiyonofuji Mitsugu
Oe no Chizato Eishosai Choki Chokusai
Chong Xin Louis Choris Wu Yong Chuan
Chuho (Daitoku-ji Shogetsu) Chun Fu Cang Lau Chun
Peggy Chun Chuzan Francisco Clemente
John Cleveley Coady, Judy Amelia Coats
Cohen, Phyllis J. Llaine Colquhoun Ted Colyer
Zhiyuan Cong OM Connell Captain James Cook
George Cooke A.D.M. Cooper R. Cooper
Richard Creifelds John Critchfield Pascal Cucaro
Dan Cunningham Bob Dahlquist Dai Jin
Shaku Daibi Daido Ryoun Nishigaki Daido
Daiko Sogen Daio Daitoku-ji Dairyu
Salvador Dali Robert Dampier Eva Dang
Elsie Jensen Das Russell Davidson Louis Auguste de Sainson
Kauka de Silva Gaspard Duche de Vancy Deguchi Hidemaru
Izawa Deiryu Takahashi Deishu Jack Delaney
Rick Dellera Jean-Jacques Dicker Daniel Djurberg
Do Thi Kim Doan Obaku Dogen Isami Doi
Obaku Dokuryu Dormann Jean-Baptiste Emile Dropsy
Du Deng Pierre du Val Sir Robert Dudley
Kim Duffett RTS Durston Sydenham Edwards
David Michael Eggly Eigaku Eigyoku
Mamiya Eiju Keisai Eisen Eishi
Eisho Kano, Eishuku Ichirakutei Eisui
Kikugawa Eizan Adolf Ekelof Takeda, Ekiju
Fedor Encke Jodi Endicott Barbara Engle
Kerne Erickson Esatsu Robert Lee Eskridge
Kinryu Essen Obaku Etsuzan Jean Evans
Kandi Everett Fan Er Lin Herve Fay
Patrice Federspiel Fei Xi Jane Fellerman
Feng Kang Hou Feng Zikai 豐子愷 Field, Isabel
Michael Field Patty Field Findikoglu, Zeki
Jessie S. Fisher Theodore Auguste Fisquet Cornelia Macintyre Foley
Wylog Fong Fontaine Gloria Foss
Robert Aaron Frame Juliette May Fraser Tip Freeman
Paul Frenzeny Richard Frooman Anna Stewart Root Frost
Fu Baoshi 傅抱石 Fugai Ekun Fugai Honko
Fujii Kaho Shumei Fujii Fujiki, Kikumaro
Fumio Fujita Fujiwara, Jitoku Fujiwara, Sogaku
Fuluis Luigi Fumagalli Alfred Furtado
Furukawa Taiko Fusatane Gaho
Yashima Gakutei Gansho Thomas S. Garcia
D. Gaston J.W. Gear Ogata, Gekko
Yamamoto Gempo Murase Genmyo Gento
Gessen Yoshimoto Gesso Getsuzo
Gien Margaret Girvin Gillin Adachi Ginko
Gito Ueda Gizan Gocho
Kato Goun Matsunaga Gozan Grace, Connie
Albert Melville Graves David Graves J. Barry Greene
Anthony Gruerio Gu Jian Long 顧見龍 Gu Jue Men
Gu Jue Min Gu Luo Gu Xi Mei
Gu Yun Guan Shanyue 關山月 Goyo Gukei
Richard Gullickson Guo-An Alfred Richard Gurrey, Sr.
Furukawa Gyodo Gyokko Gyoko
Gyoksen Obaku Gyokuden Gyokumin
Gyokuran Gyokurin So'oku Gyokuryu
Gyokusen Gyokushu Gyokuso
Gyokuso Trevor Haddon Haga Koshiro
Hideo Hagiwara Moira Hahn Haku Maki
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Enso by Shimizu Kosho Enso by Shimizu Kosho

Shimizu Kosho (1911-1999)
"Within not one thing
Not a speck of dust."
(signed) Grand Abbot Kosho

     The inscription is a clever and provocative variation of the usual ?not one thing? phrase. In this case, the meaning of the inscription is more philosophical:  ?Within not one thing [=non-attachment] there is not a speck of dust [=innately pure].? Or in other words, the universe is perfect just as it is. Kosho was quite eccentric, and very innovative, qualities that are reflected in the almost loopy brushwork of the enso and the inscription.
     Shimizu Kosho was long-time abbot of the famous temple Todai-ji (home of the Great Buddha) in Nara. In his late fifties Kosho began to produce art as an aspect of his teaching; he was a popular and extraordinarily prolific artist in various media.

Fishing Boats by Juliette May Fraser Fishing Boats by Juliette May Fraser

An original etching on paper of several boats at harbor.  Signed "J.M. Fraser" in lower right margin.

Mamala, The Surf Rider (37/50) by Mayumi Oda Mamala, The Surf Rider (37/50) by Mayumi Oda

Limited edition hand pulled serigraph, part of the Goddess Series. Signed, numbered and titled by the artist in pencil.

Mt. Fuji Fan by Nantembo Toju Mt. Fuji Fan by Nantembo Toju

"Fuji's peak pierces the heavens,
draped with the snow of a thousand years,
and tinted with the golden rays of the rising sun of Tokai
as it floats serenely [above the clouds].
Stop trying to extol its incomparable beauty -
the heroic symbol of our sacred land."

Fuji poem originally composed by General Nogi, inscription and painting by Nantembo Toju.

The famous general Nogi Maresuke (1849-1912), one of Nantembo's Zen students, composed this poem for a Mount Fuji painting brushed by Nantembo in January of 1911 (or 1910 according to some sources). Nantembo often used it thereafter as the primary inscription on his many Fuji paintings. This was done in Nantembo's 80th year.

Moon Enso by Sottakusai Moon Enso by Sottakusai

Sottakusai (1744-1808)
"The original
Inspiration for [enlightenment]?
The moon in the sky."
[Sottakusai] Kao*
     *Tea masters often use just their kao, no signature or seals, to identify their brushwork.

     This enso painting is by a tea master, Sottakusai.  Enso brushed by tea masters are typically quiet and refined, and this one is no exception. The inscription seems to mean that nature itself is the best teacher of Zen---who is not inspired by the full moon shining in the vast sky??and that contemplation of [Buddha-]nature can lead to enlightenment. One rather curious feature of this enso painting is the feeling that the moon is drifting up and away from the inscription.
     Sottakusai was 8th Headmaster of the Omote Senke School of Tea. At age seven Sottakusai lost his father, the previous headmaster. Sotakusai assumed the heavy responsibility of Headmaster at the young age of thirteen. Like most tea masters he practiced Zen as well; Sottakusai trained under the direction of Mugaku of Daitoku-ji.

Moon Enso by Plum Valley Hermit Moon Enso by Plum Valley Hermit

Plum Valley Hermit (17th century?)
"As the snow lifts,
the distant peaks
Of Mt. Yoshino
Shimmer softly in the light
Of the morning moon."
Brushed by the Plum Valley Hermit of Kamakura.

Judging from the condition and age of the paper, this enso painting is quite old but the brushwork still appears fresh and bright. Judging from the calligraphy and the poetic style of the inscription?some of it missing?this was done by a literary figure, likely an aristocrat with some Zen training.
This is an example of the timelessness of the Zen circle. It is difficult to date the work in a particular century?and it doesn?t really matter. The poetic sentiment is valid in any era, and the morning moon continues to shine and inspire.

Shell Ginger by Joel Bright Shell Ginger by Joel Bright

Prize winning contemporary wood sculpture of shell ginger on a background of mother-of-curl koa. The ginger plant is made of hau, kamani, eucalyptus, coffee wood, and noni. This piece won first place at the 2008 Woods of Hawaii Show in the open division as well as the Artist's Choice Award.

What the Hell Is This? Enso by Nakagawa Soen What the Hell Is This? Enso by Nakagawa Soen

Nakagawa Soen (1907-1984)
What the hell is this?
(signed) Soen

Usually the inscription ?What is this?? is written in classical Chinese but here Soen has used the colloquial Japanese expression ?Kore dan da.? This has the sense of ?What the hell is this?? in English. Such a humorous inscription has the effect of bringing the enso painting down to earth, so to speak, making it less intimidating. Evidently, Soen had trouble brushing the enso on the fan, making it so misshapen and difficult to recognize that ?What is this?? is an actual question.
Zany and unpredictable Nakagawa Soen was one of the pioneers of Zen in the United States. Soen, abbot of Ryutaku-ji where a number of prominent Western Zen elders trained, visited the U.S. and Europe many times. Soen was also an accomplished haiku poet. He was a prolific and creative Zen artist, leaving behind thousands of Zenga, including one enso created with a brush dipped in a cup of coffee.

Daruma by Izawa Deiryu Daruma by Izawa Deiryu

"The First Patriarch came to the west
But did not explain a single word.
Deiryu"

This is Deiryu's version of Daruma: Daruma did not come from India to China and beyond to give us more theory; he came to teach the experience of meditation -- the physical and spiritual realization of Buddha-nature in the here and now -- an experience that cannot be explained no matter how many words are used.

Deiryu (1895-1954) was the disciple of Nantembo, and he was a prolific and creative Zen artist.

One Line Calligraphy by Yamaoka Tesshu One Line Calligraphy by Yamaoka Tesshu

"One hearth with one simmering tea kettle"

This calligraphy was likely done as a request for a scroll to display during a tea ceremony. A good tea ceremony focuses on the basics?a few guests gathered around a single hearth, listing to the quiet sound of simmering water in a single kettle.
Tesshu (1836-1888) was a master of Zen, Swordsmanship, and Calligraphy.

A new custom-fitted Japanese kiri wood box is included for safe handling and storage.

Sanjo Bridge by Kotozuka, Eiichi Sanjo Bridge by Kotozuka, Eiichi

A night scene of the famous Sanjo Bridge with snow falling.

Mount Fuji by Nantembo Toju Mount Fuji by Nantembo Toju

"Fuji's peak pierces the heavens,
draped with the snow of a thousand years,
and tinted with the golden rays of the rising sun of Tokai
as it floats serenely [above the clouds].
Stop trying to extol its incomparable beauty -
the heroic symbol of our sacred land."

Fuji poem originally composed by General Nogi, inscription and painting by Nantembo Toju.

The famous general Nogi Maresuke (1849-1912), one of Nantembo's Zen students, composed this poem for a Mount Fuji painting brushed by Nantembo in January of 1911 (or 1910 according to some sources). Nantembo often used it thereafter as the primary inscription on his many Fuji paintings. Usually Mount fuji is most prominent but here the calligraphy takes precedence in the composition. The calligraphy flows up and down gracefully in the space above Fuji. The mountain is formed with rich, luminous brushstrokes. This is a splendid example of Nantembo's Zenga. This was done in Nantembo's 80th year.

(From Zen Mind; Zen Brush, Japanese ink paintings from the Gitter-Yelen collection.)

Hirosaki Castle by Yoshida, Hiroshi 吉田  博 Hirosaki Castle by Yoshida, Hiroshi 吉田 博

This is a beautifully rendered scene with blossoming cherry blossoms in the foreground with the steep stone wall and castle in the background.  Notice the delicacy of the shadows reflected in the moat and the shading of the branches. Yoshida was the leading landscape artist of the early 20th century and travelled extensively throughout Japan and all over the world for inspiration.  Pencil signed on bottom right with jizuri (self-printed) seal on the left margin.
Abe, 'The Complete Woodblock Prints of Yoshida Hiroshi', #192, p.139

Teru-teru Bozu by Nishihara, Hiroshi Teru-teru Bozu by Nishihara, Hiroshi

This is a charming scene of a boy and girl gazing out a window.  Above their heads, are two hanging dolls which are called teru-teru bozu. Teru-teru bozu is a little traditional hand-made doll made of white paper or cloth that Japanese farmers began hanging outside of their window by a string. This amulet is supposed to have magical powers to bring good weather and to stop or prevent a rainy day.  The children are waiting for the rain to stop so they can go out to play.

Hasan Jinja by Fukusada Mugai Hasan Jinja by Fukusada Mugai

"HASAN JINJA
     Respectfully brushed by 72-year old Mugai of Rinno-ji"

     Hasan, ?Leaf Mountain?, is the name of a Jinja  (?God?s Residence?) in Matsushima; this kind of calligraphy is thought to bring the spirit of the mountain god into one?s dwelling. In a much wider sense, ?Leaf Mountain God?s Residence? can be taken to mean that the Divine or Buddha-nature (depending on what you want to call it) is at home everywhere.
     Fukusada Mugai (1881-1943) restored and served as abbot of Rinno-ji in Sendai. Mugai is famed for telling the militarists who came to confiscate the big bronze temple bell to be melted down for the war effort:  ?Any nation that turns holy objects into instruments of destruction will surely be defeated!?

Moonlight Path (A/P) by Hiroki Morinoue Moonlight Path (A/P) by Hiroki Morinoue

Artist's Proof titled, signed, numbered, and dated in lower margin. Some staining.

Flowing Moon by Omori Sogen Flowing Moon by Omori Sogen

"Water flows in harmony with the moon.
     [So]Gen Dojin"

Omori Sogen (1904-1994) was a well-known Rinzai Zen master, a martial artist, and a calligrapher. Sogen founded the Tesshu Society to promote the teachings of that master.

A new custom-fitted Japanese kiri wood box is included for safe handling and storage.

No Value Enso by Gocho No Value Enso by Gocho

"NO
VALUE
Brushed by Hensho Kongo
Gocho"

When the two characters (無価) of the inscription are pronounced muka they mean ?no value,? and ?worthless.? However, when the Buddhist pronunciation muge is used they mean ?invaluable? and ?priceless.? That is, the jewel of enlightenment (symbolized by the enso) is precious beyond all value.
Gocho (1749-1835) was a wonder-working Tendai monk. He was a friend of Zen master Sengai. Gocho was a first-rate painter of conventional Buddha images but he excelled as a Zen artist. His brushwork is creative, free flowing, and radiant. Gocho ranks as one of the top Zenga masters.

Everyday Mind is the Way by Nantembo Toju Everyday Mind is the Way by Nantembo Toju

"Everyday Mind is the Way!
(signed) 82-year old Nantembo Toju"

The origin of this famous Zen saying comes from a dialogue of the 8th century Chinese master Baso:

A monk asked, ?What is the Way?? Baso replied, ?Everyday Mind is the Way!?

?Everyday Mind is the Way? (heijo-shin) is a key concept in Zen and the martial arts. One needs to maintain a natural, even keel state of mind amid all of life?s activities and during any challenge that might arise.

Koa Jewel/Collector's Chest by Joel Bright Koa Jewel/Collector's Chest by Joel Bright

Contemporary chest and stand for displaying jewelry or other small collectors items. The chest is made of curly koa with pheasant wood (senna siamea) trim and legs. The inside of the chest is lined with Port Orford cedar.

Joel Bright has created unique jewelry boxes for collectors from around the world, including HRH, Princess Sayako of Japan.

Old Pages by Andy Kay Old Pages by Andy Kay

Contemporary collage of paper, gold leaf, and acrylics.

Mandarin Hall by Andy Kay Mandarin Hall by Andy Kay

Contemporary collage of paper, white (paladium) and yellow gold leaf, and acrylics.

Kamo Tsutsumi by Otagaki Rengetsu Kamo Tsutsumi by Otagaki Rengetsu

                                か    ち
                 そ            も     ど
         よ     で    月   が    り
         わ    に    更   は    鳴
     の     お    て     つ
         初   ぼ          々
      し    ゆ           み
蓮    む    る
月

chidori naku
kamogawa tsutsumi
tsuki fukete
sode ni oboyuru
yowa no hatsushimo
     Rengetsu

As the moon ascends
Plovers cry along
The Kamogawa-tsutsumi path--
Night deepens, first frost
Settles on my sleeves.
     Rengetsu

Kamogawa-tsutsumi is a path along the Kamo River. It is famous for its beauty: cherry blossoms in spring, and colorful foliage in autumn. This poem was written in autumn when Rengetsu was walking along the path, moon viewing. The painting is of the stone wall and small pillars that line the river.

Zen Bull by Tsuo Zen Bull by Tsuo

A bull is the ideal Zen animal. ?When it moves, it really moves; when it sits, it really sits.?

Tsuo was a Rinzai monk who spent most of his life as abbot of Toko-ji in what is now Tochigi Prefecture. He brushed simple Zenga in the whimsical style we see here. Zen bull paintings were his trademark.

Kannon by Takahashi Deishu Kannon by Takahashi Deishu

Kannon by Takahashi Deishu

無説無聞是真般若
泥舟居士写

"Nothing to explain, nothing to ask -- this is true wisdom
Painted by Deishu Koji"

Kannon, the Bodhisattva of Compassion, does whatever it takes to save sentient beings. She never needs an explanation or asks for a reason when someone wants help. Another interpretation is: "True awakening is beyond questions and answers. There is nothing to affirm or deny. Like Kannon, repose in deep wisdom, all the while being present in the world."
Deishu (1835-1903), a samurai master of the spear, retired from public life at the time of the Meiji Restoration in 1868. Thereafter, Deishu devoted himself to calligraphy, painting and poetry. Deishu is considered one of the finest calligraphers of the Meiji period. The inscription is brushed in Deishu's distinctive style: strong, supple, and bright.

Drunk On The Moon Enso by Daitoku-ji Dairyu Drunk On The Moon Enso by Daitoku-ji Dairyu

Drunk on the Moon Enso by Daitoku-ji Dairyu

酔 坐
月 花
紫野大龍書

"Sitting under the Blossoms,
Drunk on the Moon!
Brushed by Murasakino [=Daitoku-ji] Abbot Dairyu"

To be in such a state of glorious intoxication can be taken lieterally -- actually sitting underneath the blossoms sipping on sake, getting tipsy and enjoying the moon. Or symbolically -- basking th the glow of the full moon (=enlightenment) and delighting i Buddha-nature (=cherry blossoms). Doing both at the same time is as good as it gets.
Dairyu (Great Dragon) lived from 1692-1751. He was the 341st abbot of Daitoku-ji. Dairyu designed the famous teahouse Nanmei-an on the grounds of Gyokurin-in. He was the Zen master of Kawakami Fuhaku, the founder of the Fuhaku School of tea ceremony.